Lab Members

Dr. Russell Groves

Professor, Department Chair, and Vegetable Extension Specialist

Phone:  (608) 262-3229
Email: groves@entomology.wisc.edu

Curriculum Vitae

Education

Ph.D. Entomology – N.C. State University, 2001
M.S. Entomology – University of Arkansas, 1992
B.S. Forestry – Iowa State University, 1989

About me

As a Vegetable Extension Specialist (65%) and Applied Insect Ecologist (35%) in the Department of Entomology at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, my responsibilities include the development, implementation, and delivery of a research-based, extension program to support integrated pest management of insect and mite pests affecting fresh-market and processing vegetable production in Wisconsin.

My extension and research program is centered on the ecology and management of insects of commercial and fresh market vegetable crops. To meet current and emerging challenges, novel research approaches are formulated in response to the stated needs of Wisconsin vegetable growers and producers, cooperating statewide and regional Extension Specialists, County Extension Agricultural Agents, pest management practitioners, crop consultants, and other agribusiness stakeholders in order to assess immediate and developing pest problems. Next, my research program tests hypotheses that further the understanding of pest population biology based on sound ecological principles derived from a combination of both field and laboratory research. Here, it is essential to balance the development of short-term solutions to these immediate and emerging problems, which out of necessity may require purely empirical and at times ad-hoc approaches, with research to develop fundamental concepts and knowledge that will lead to the development of long-term sustainable solutions. Solutions and strategies developed for the commercial and fresh-market vegetable industry must be durable, economical and both environmentally and socially acceptable to remain effective against key, vegetable pest species affecting the industry.

As an extension educator, it is my goal to create an environment conducive to learning and information exchange where vegetable industry stakeholders can be motivated to acquire new information, concepts and skills. A successful extension and research program is most often the result of a team of collaborators working together. My extension and applied research-based program collaborates with research and extension faculty within the departments of Entomology, Horticulture, Plant Pathology, and Crop Science at the University of Wisconsin as well as scientists from other institutions.

Research Staff

Dr. Scott Chapman

chapman@entomology.wisc.edu

Scott has long been associated with the Department of Entomology here at the University of Wisconsin where he received by a M.S (1998) and a PhD (2003) under the direction of Dr. Jeffrey Wyman.  After completion of his advanced degree, Scott continued to work in the Vegetable Entomology program and soon thereafter also assumed responsibilities in the Field and Forage Crops Plant Pathology program.

He is responsible in part for planning, conducting, evaluating, analyzing, and reporting field research on the management of insect pests and plant pathogens on vegetable and field cropping systems, as well as recruiting, training, and managing summer hourly employees.  Scott is also responsible for planning and conducting residue trials for minor crop registrations using IR4, GLP protocols.

Education:
Ph.D. Entomology – University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2003
M.S. Entomology – University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1998
B.S. Biology – University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point, 1995


Ben Bradford

bbradford@wisc.edu

Ben completed his M.S. degree in the Groves Lab and is continuing on in the lab working on a variety of projects, including the upkeep of this website.  During his time as a graduate student, he explored the problem of groundwater contamination by neonicotinoid insecticides, specifically thiamethoxam, by surveying high-capacity irrigation wells in the Central Sands vegetable growing region of Wisconsin.   In addition to describing the spatial extent and magnitude of this contamination, his thesis explored of the relationship between neonicotinoid contamination and landscape composition in the vicinity of sampled wells. Prior to moving to Wisconsin to pursue a degree in Entomology, Ben worked with the USDA-ARS Aquatic and Invasive Weeds Research Unit in Davis and Albany, CA.

Education:
M.S. Entomology – University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2016
B.S. Biology – University of California, Davis, 2008

Graduate Students

Chris Blume

cjblume@wisc.edu

Chris is currently a Ph.D. student in the Groves Lab. He is researching the genetics of corn rootworm and how resistance to insecticides and transgenic Bt corn is influenced by landscape and agronomic factors.


Morgan Weissner

weissner@wisc.edu

My name is Morgan and I am from Chicago, Illinois. I have always had a special interest for insects which has led me into the field of Entomology! Growing up in a city, I definitely did not have much exposure to a wide range of insects, but I have greatly enjoyed being able to expand my knowledge and connection with them through my education.

I finished my Bachelor’s in entomology with a certificate in sustainability here at UW, and my time as an undergraduate introduced me to the aspects of IPM and insects in agricultural settings. My grandparents owned their own farm here in Wisconsin for most of their lives, so working with insects in agriculture is a great connection to my own and my family’s experiences!


Emma Terris

eterris@wisc.edu

I am from the Twin Cities area in Minnesota and am so excited to begin the second chapter of my Wisconsin experience! Originally pursuing the PreMed track, I switched my focus after working as a summer field researcher in Wisconsin and becoming more interested in food systems.

Some areas of research that excite me are anything involving genetics and genomics, the interaction between humans and the environment, and global health topics as they relate to agriculture. In the fall I will be joining the Schoville lab working with potato beetles, which I am quite acquainted with from my brief time in the field.


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